School of Economic Science
Christmas Poems

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    School of Economic Science - Study Forums Forum Index -> Poetry Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
David Taylor



Joined: 15 Nov 2007
Posts: 254
Location: Sutton, Surrey, UK

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: Christmas Poems Reply with quote

A space for all to post their favourite Christmas Poems.

To start here is perhaps the most famous of all. Clement Clarke Moore (1779 - 1863) wrote the poem Twas the night before Christmas also called “A Visit from St. Nicholas" in 1822. It is now the tradition in many families to read the poem Christmas Eve. The poem Twas the night before Christmas has redefined our image of Christmas and Santa Claus. Prior to the creation of the story of Twas the night before Christmas St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children, had never been associated with a sleigh or reindeers! The author of the poem was a reticent man and it is believed that a family friend, Miss H. Butler, sent a copy of the poem to the New York Sentinel who published the poem. The condition of publication was that the author was to remain anonymous. The first publication date was 23rd December 1823 and it was an immediate success. It was not until 1844 that Clement Clarke Moore claimed ownership when the work was included in a book of his poetry. Clement Clarke Moore came from a prominent family and his father Benjamin Moore was the Bishop of New York who was famous for officiating at the inauguration of George Washington. The tradition of reading Twas the night before Christmas poem on Christmas Eve is now a Worldwide institution.


Twas the Night before Christmas

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St Nicholas soon would be there.

The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads.
And mamma in her ‘kerchief, and I in my cap,
Had just settled our brains for a long winter’s nap.

When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.

The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow
Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below.
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a miniature sleigh, and eight tinny reindeer.

With a little old driver, so lively and quick,
I knew in a moment it must be St Nick.
More rapid than eagles his coursers they came,
And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name!

"Now Dasher! now, Dancer! now, Prancer and Vixen!
On, Comet! On, Cupid! on, on Donner and Blitzen!
To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall!
Now dash away! Dash away! Dash away all!"

As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,
When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky.
So up to the house-top the coursers they flew,
With the sleigh full of Toys, and St Nicholas too.

And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof
The prancing and pawing of each little hoof.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Down the chimney St Nicholas came with a bound.

He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,
And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot.
A bundle of Toys he had flung on his back,
And he looked like a peddler, just opening his pack.

His eyes-how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow.

The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath.
He had a broad face and a little round belly,
That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly!

He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,
And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself!
A wink of his eye and a twist of his head,
Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.

He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
And filled all the stockings, then turned with a jerk.
And laying his finger aside of his nose,
And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose!

He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ‘ere he drove out of sight,
"Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good-night!"

Clement Clarke Moore (1779 - 1863)

_________________
David
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cheryl ALbrecht



Joined: 12 May 2009
Posts: 99
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 4:39 am    Post subject: Elizabeth B Browning from The Virgin Mary To The Child Jesus Reply with quote

from "The Virgin Mary To The Child Jesus"


I often wandered forth, more child than maiden,
Among the midnight hills of Galilee,
Whose summits looked heaven-laden;
Listening to silence as it seemed to be
God's voice, so soft yet strong--so fain to press
Upon my heart as heaven did on the height,
And waken up its shadows by a light,
And show its vileness by a holiness.
Then I knelt down most silent like the night,
Too self-renounced for fears,
Raising my small face to the boundless blue
Whose stars did mix and tremble in my tears.
God heard them falling after--with His dew.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

*******
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cheryl ALbrecht



Joined: 12 May 2009
Posts: 99
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 5:02 am    Post subject: Traditional Carol Reply with quote

Angels we have heard on high
Sweetly singing o'er the plains,
And the mountains in reply
Echoing their joyous strains.
Gloria, in excelsis Deo,
Gloria, in excelsis Deo.

Shepherds, why this jubilee?
Why your joyous strains prolong?
What the gladsome tidings be
Which inspire your heavenly song?
Gloria, in excelsis Deo,
Gloria, in excelsis Deo.


Come to Bethlehem and see
Christ Whose birth the angels sing;
Come, adore on bended knee,
Christ the Lord, the newborn King.
Gloria, in excelsis Deo,
Gloria, in excelsis Deo.

Traditional Carol 1855

*******
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cheryl ALbrecht



Joined: 12 May 2009
Posts: 99
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 7:18 am    Post subject: John Milton from "The Hymn" Reply with quote

V

But peaceful was the night
Wherein the Prince of Light
His reign of peace upon the earth began.
The winds, with wonder whist,
Smoothly the waters kissed,
Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean,
Who now hath quite forgot to rave,
While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed wave.

VI

The stars, with deep amaze,
Stand fixed in steadfast gaze,
Bending one way their precious influence,
And will not take their flight,
For all the morning light,
Or Lucifer that often warned them thence;
But in their glimmering orbs did glow,
Until their Lord himself bespake, and bid them go.

VII

And, though the shady gloom
Had given day her room,
The Sun himself withheld his wonted speed,
And hid his head of shame,
As his inferior flame
The new-enlightened world no more should need:
He saw a greater Sun appear
Than his bright Throne or burning axletree could bear.

VIII

The Shepherds on the lawn,
Or ere the point of dawn,
Sat simply chatting in a rustic row;
Full little thought they than
That the mighty Pan
Was kindly come to live with them below:
Perhaps their loves, or else their sheep,
Was all that did their silly thoughts so busy keep.

IX

When such music sweet
Their hearts and ears did greet
As never was by mortal finger strook,
Divinely-warbled voice
Answering the stringèd noise,
As all their souls in blissful rapture took:
The air, such pleasure loth to lose,
With thousand echoes still prolongs each heavenly close.

X

Nature, that heard such sound
Beneath the hollow round
Of Cynthia’s seat the airy Region thrilling,
Now was almost won
To think her part was done,
And that her reign had here its last fulfilling:
She knew such harmony alone
Could hold all Heaven and Earth in happier union.

XI

At last surrounds their sight
A globe of circular light,
That with long beams the shamefaced Night arrayed;
The helmèd Cherubim
And sworded Seraphim
Are seen in glittering ranks with wings displayed,
Harping in loud and solemn quire,
With unexpressive notes, to Heaven’s newborn Heir.

XII

Such music (as ’tis said)
Before was never made,
But when of old the Sons of Morning sung,
While the Creator great
His constellations set,
And the well-balanced World on hinges hung,
And cast the dark foundations deep,
And bid the weltering waves their oozy channel keep.

XIII

Ring out, ye crystal spheres!
Once bless our human ears,
If ye have power to touch our senses so;
And let your silver chime
Move in melodious time;
And let the bass of heaven’s deep organ blow;
And with your ninefold harmony
Make up full consort of the angelic symphony.

John Milton

*******
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Edward Roberts



Joined: 26 Nov 2008
Posts: 191
Location: Twickenham, London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:25 am    Post subject: In the bleak mid-winter ... Reply with quote

As subsequently set to music as one of the English-speaking world's favourite carols ...

A Christmas Carol

In the bleak mid-winter 

Frosty wind made moan,

Earth stood hard as iron, 

Water like a stone;

Snow had fallen, snow on snow, 

Snow on snow,

In the bleak mid-winter

Long ago.

Our God, Heaven cannot hold Him 

Nor earth sustain;

Heaven and earth shall flee away

When He comes to reign:

In the bleak mid-winter 

A stable-place sufficed

The Lord God Almighty, 

Jesus Christ.

Enough for Him, whom cherubim 

Worship night and day,

A breastful of milk 

And a mangerful of hay;

Enough for Him, whom angels 

Fall down before,

The ox and ass and camel 

Which adore.

Angels and archangels 

May have gathered there,

Cherubim and seraphim 

Thronged the air,

But only His mother

In her maiden bliss,

Worshipped the Beloved 

With a kiss.

What can I give Him, 

Poor as I am?

If I were a shepherd

I would bring a lamb,

If I were a wise man

I would do my part,

Yet what I can I give Him, 

Give my heart.

Christina Rosetti
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Edward Roberts



Joined: 26 Nov 2008
Posts: 191
Location: Twickenham, London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:23 am    Post subject: Out-sing the daylight hours ... Reply with quote

A two-part poem by George Herbert, the first part being a sonnet (or "little song") and the second a celebration of incarnation, song and the light of music human and divine ...

Christmas

After all pleasures as I rid one day,
My horse and I, both tired, body and mind,
With full cry of affections, quite astray;
I took up the next inn I could find.

There when I came, whom found I but my dear,
My dearest Lord, expecting till the grief
Of pleasures brought me to Him, ready there
To be all passengers' most sweet relief?

Oh Thou, whose glorious, yet contracted light,
Wrapt in night's mantle, stole into a manger;
Since my dark soul and brutish is Thy right,
To man of all beasts be not Thou a stranger:

Furnish and deck my soul, that Thou mayst have
A better lodging, than a rack, or grave.

The shepherds sing; and shall I silent be?
My God, no hymn for Thee?
My soul's a shepherd too; a flock it feeds
Of thoughts, and words, and deeds.
The pasture is Thy word: the streams, Thy grace
Enriching all the place.
Shepherd and flock shall sing, and all my powers
Out-sing the daylight hours.
Then will we chide the sun for letting night
Take up his place and right:
We sing one common Lord; wherefore he should
Himself the candle hold.
I will go searching, till I find a sun
Shall stay, till we have done;
A willing shiner, that shall shine as gladly,
As frost-nipped suns look sadly.
Then will we sing, and shine all our own day,
And one another pay:
His beams shall cheer my breast, and both so twine,
Till ev'n His beams sing, and my music shine.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Edward Roberts



Joined: 26 Nov 2008
Posts: 191
Location: Twickenham, London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:57 am    Post subject: Behold the father is his daughter's son ... Reply with quote

Eternal life to live doth now begin ...

The paradoxical nature of incarnation, expressed by Robert Southwell (1561-1595) ...

The Nativity of Christ

Behold the father is his daughter’s son,
The bird that built the nest is hatched therein,
The old of years an hour hath not outrun,
Eternal life to live doth now begin,
The Word is dumb, the mirth of heaven doth weep,
Might feeble is, and force doth faintly creep.

Gift better than himself God doth not know;
Gift better than his God no man can see.
This gift doth here the giver given bestow;
Gift to this gift let each receiver be.
God is my gift, himself he freely gave me;
God’s gift am I, and none but God shall have me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anosh javed



Joined: 16 Mar 2015
Posts: 1
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice post helps me alot thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cheryl ALbrecht



Joined: 12 May 2009
Posts: 99
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Dec 24, 2015 3:41 am    Post subject: Christmas Night Reply with quote

[/b]Hallelujah[b]

Hallelujah . . .
Hallelujah . . .

moon aglow so full
praises lord of the sun
but they see as one
we in between with
love rising praising
Hallelujah . . .
ever in praise gaze
without yet within
wakened heart now rings
vibrating strings sing
Hallelujah . . .
ever due delight
praise for day and night
joyous resounding

Hallelujah . . .
Hallelujah

Cheryl Albrecht
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pol Paul
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank u very much!
Back to top
David A Taylor



Joined: 20 Aug 2015
Posts: 72
Location: Penang, Malaysia

PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 4:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Christmas in Malaysia

No snow will fall, no reindeer fly,
some children still will cry.

The shops are full, the rivers dry,
no fairy lights to twinkle in my eye.

But then, with spirits running high,
observing all the busy passers-by.

It must be said, and not be denied,
that Christ was born and then died.

That all men, and women too,
and all their past and present kin.

Shall receive, both hope and cheer,
as Christmas once again draws near.

Much Love for all, both short and tall,
"A Merry Christmas" is my call!

May all with whom you talk and walk,
meet that Love which Christ has taught.

_________________
David
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
alice brant



Joined: 22 Feb 2017
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hopeless romantic. All about love. Funny love stories ... Broken heart poems. Christmas love poems. Classic love poems. Cute love poems. Emo love poems ...
_________________
buy assignment online
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    School of Economic Science - Study Forums Forum Index -> Poetry Forum All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
This forum is sponsored by the School of Economic Science for use by its members; members of its branches; members
of affiliated schools worldwide and by all other Internet users interested in the study subjects presented.
Powered by phpBB Copyright © FSES, 2007. All Rights Reserved